Theology

Philosophy
The Theology Department provides a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive, and systematic curriculum of Catholic beliefs to strengthen students’ personal relationships with God, deepen their knowledge of the Catholic faith, and integrate these beliefs and traditions into their lives. Topics include the purpose and meaning of faith in everyday life; the Sacred Scripture; covenant and salvation history; Church history; Catholic moral theology, particularly the Theology of the Body; an exploration of major world religions; and an understanding of life’s purpose through vocation and the maturation of students’ spirituality.
Course Offerings and Descriptions
This course deepens students’ understanding of their lives as a Christian Catholic and member of the Church. Topics include the Trinity and our human identity as a reflection of the Blessed Trinity, the Blessed Mother, the Rosary and other Catholic prayer traditions, the Saints, the Sacraments, the Mass, the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy, the Pascal Mystery, the Kingdom of God, the Two Great Commandments and an in-depth study of Church teaching on the Eucharist.
 
Credit: 5
Quality Point Group: I
Open to Grade: 8
Prerequisite: None
Theology I, an introduction to Catholic Christianity for freshmen, explores the meaning and purpose of religion in everyday life. As a general introduction, it leads students toward a deeper, more mature relationship with God and participation in Catholic life within the school and in the world at large. Students will learn about the Bible as the living word of God, Jesus Christ as God’s ultimate Revelation, and the mystery of the Blessed Trinity and its implications for living the Christian life.
 
Credit: 5
Quality Point Group: I
Open to Grade: 9
Prerequisite: None
This course focuses on all that God has done for humanity through his Son, Jesus Christ, and the redemption Christ won for us. Students will study the Church that was founded by Christ through the Apostles and sustained by him through the Holy Spirit, the Church as the living Body of Christ in both its divine and human elements, and what life as a disciple of Christ entails. Most importantly, the course poses the question, “Who is Jesus?” and attempts to answer it with an examination of His life, teaching, and ministry.
 
Credit: 5
Quality Point Group: I
Open to Grade: 10
Prerequisite: Theology I
This course includes units on the History of the Church, Inter-Religious Dialogue and Christian Call to Holiness. The first semester begins with the story of God’s intervention into human history in the Person of his Son and continues through his Church to the present day. Students will come to a deeper understanding of the history of the Church. A study of Ecumenism will help the students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to other religions of the world. Building on the foundational truth that Jesus Christ established the Catholic Church, the course is intended to help students recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in other religions. The second semester will help students understand vocations of life: how Christ calls us to live. In this course, students learn what it means to live life for the benefit of others and the value in considering a vocation in service to the Christian Community.
 
Credit: 5
Quality Point Group: I
Open to Grade: 11
Prerequisite: Theology II
In the first semester students will study the Sacraments in depth and be introduced to the Moral life in Christ. Students will understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the sacraments, and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life. Students will learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples as a response to living a Sacramental Life. The second semester is a deepening of development of conscience in the moral life. This course aids the formation of consciences by presenting an overview of the moral teachings of the Catholic Church. This is followed by a study of Catholic social teaching. Students are to learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and less fortunate, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission.
 
Credit: 5
Quality Point Group: I
Open to Grade: 12
Prerequisite: Theology II